Broughton Group - South

Kayaking the Broughton Archipelago - Southern Waters

NOTE:  You need your chart of the area in front of you as you scroll down this page.

Broughton Archipelago Park, B.C.’s largest marine park, consists of dozens of remote wilderness islands and islets situated between Blackfish Sound and  the mouth of Knight Inlet on the west side of Queen Charlotte Strait. For kayaks, The Owl Group of Islands, the Carey Group and the open waters of Blackfish Sound define a great area to see wildlife and paddle a good number of wilderness passages.

Established in 1992, Broughton Archipelago Park offers excellent kayaking and wildlife viewing opportunities. A multitude of islands provides park visitors sheltered waters and anchorages with a backdrop of the magnificent coastal mountains to the east and the waters of Queen Charlotte Strait to the west. 

These islands have been utilized by First Nation peoples for generations and there is ample evidence of their extensive use of the area. Kayakers can easily “discover” white midden beaches, culturally modified trees, clam “terraces” and even a petroglyph while exploring the park. We ask that you do not alter any of these sensitive native hertiage sites. Kayakers have visited these areas for many years and have left nothing but their foot prints, we ask you to continue this treatment of the area.

This park is extremely popular with sea kayakers from around the world. Most sea kayakers prefer the southern portion of the park, though increasing numbers are starting to discover the beauty of the northern islands and their protected waterways. 

Telegraph Cove Sea Kayaking can outfit you with sea kayak equipment, communication devices, shuttle boat transport and local knowledge for your kayaking adventure in the Broughton Archipelago. Each of these services has a moderate cost attached to it.

In order to get to “the Indian Group,” from Telegraph Cove you must cross the open waters of Johnstone Strait and Blackfish Sound.  Both waterways are vast and are frequented by fluctuating tidal flows and large marine traffic vessels. Careful planning is strongly advised. Traveling further takes you across the transitional waters of the entrance to Knight Inlet.

We offer an excellent shuttle boat transport service where folks can first cruise over  tricky waters, open passages and prevailing winds on route to their first campsite. Then, when they go to do their return route, they have a better idea of what they are up against and what safety routes are available to them if the weather conditions change. Many groups have used this service with us and stated that it does nothing but add to their trip. And in the event that the weather is going to detriorate we put the transport on the last day of the trip.